Rangers affected as landmark controversial SFA guidelines introduced
Photo by Oliver Hardt - UEFA/UEFA via Getty Images

Rangers affected as landmark controversial SFA guidelines introduced

The SFA have changed their guidelines on how children’s football is coached in major recommendations which will affect the Rangers youth infrastructure.

There has been an ongoing debate over heading the ball in Scottish football after a Glasgow University report found that former footballers were 3.5 times more likely to die from brain disease.

The new guidelines effectively ban under-11s from heading the ball in training whilst they also put new limits on older children when it comes to heading.

Rangers obviously have a range of youth teams which will be affected the guidance and will be keen to adhere to the new protocols as quickly as possible.

RONALDO NEEDS TO STOP WHINING.

Heading the ball is obviously a big part of the game but given the gravity of the Glasgow University report the FAs of Scotland, England and Ireland have considered this approach.

After releasing a joint statement, Scotland, Northern Ireland and England have now adopted the guidelines [English FA].

The guidance covers training from groups agreed between under-six and under-18.

There will be no heading in the “foundation phase” of training, which covers primary school children.

The number of headers will then get more frequent in training with different regulations covering different age-groups.

This new guidance also advises coaches to use the lowest possible pressure allowed in the football for heading training and includes advice on matches.

The SFA is introducing new guidelines which effectively ban heading for certain youth age groups. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)

Whilst heading will remain an important aspect of football matches the evidence of the damage it does from a young age means coaches must now adapt their methods.

Rangers too will take heed of the changes and incorporate the guidelines into their sessions, particularly with younger children.

 


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